detailed mission statement

the NEED

Information—once a means by which to coordinate the delivery of food, shelter, and health services in humanitarian emergencies—has become a life-saving commodity in and of itself for crisis-affected populations in natural disaster and conflict situations. The protection of information systems, digital communications networks, and beneficiary data is quickly becoming a prerequisite for effective, impartial, and accountable humanitarian assistance in today’s increasingly complex operational landscape.

And yet, there are significant gaps in evidence, practice, and policy in the way that humanitarian actors and their technology partners deploy information activities and digital services in operational environments. The international community is in very early stages of understanding the challenges, issues, threats, and risks involved with information and data-related activities in support of crisis-affected populations, and there is growing evidence to suggest that these activities are exposing vulnerable populations to new threats in fragile contexts.

How will the international community respond to this state of affairs?

the RESPONSE

As vulnerable populations increasingly rely on information systems and digital services to meet their needs, humanitarian practitioners need to be equipped to navigate an evolving threat landscape at the intersection of digital and human security. And yet best practices, digital security tools, and operational guidance fail to reach the at-risk users who need them most.

In response, the Do No Digital Harm Initiative brings together a diverse set of experienced researchers and practitioners to place matters of digital security, risk mitigation, and responsible innovation at the center of humanitarian practice in the digital age.

the RESPONSE

As vulnerable populations increasingly rely on information systems and digital services to meet their needs, humanitarian practitioners need to be equipped to navigate an evolving threat landscape at the intersection of digital and human security. And yet best practices, digital security tools, and operational guidance fail to reach the at-risk users who need them most.

In response, the Do No Digital Harm Initiative brings together a diverse set of experienced researchers and practitioners to place matters of digital security, risk mitigation, and responsible innovation at the center of humanitarian practice in the digital age.

the vision

The Do No Digital Harm initiative envisions a world where the most vulnerable and marginalized populations can realize the benefits of digital inclusion, without unnecessary risk.

We’re making this happen by supporting highly vulnerable civil society groups, crisis-affected populations—and the humanitarian practitioners who serve them—to reduce harm resulting from information activities and digital services deployed in natural disaster and protracted conflict environments.

We expect that our work at the intersection of digital and human security will become a standard part of any response environment, helping to catalyze more effective, appropriate, and accountable humanitarian action through innovative practices that are ethically-principled, locally-driven, and globally-integrated.

Do no digital harm is administered by the friendly people at digitally responsible aid