THE DIGITALIZATION OF HUMANITARIAN RESPONSE PRESENTS NEW RISKS FOR CRISIS-AFFECTED POPULATIONS

Organizations around the world are coming together under the
Do No Digital Harm Initiative
to respond.

Organizations around the world are coming together under the
Do No Digital Harm Initiative
to respond.

A world-wide mission across multiple fronts

The Do No Digital Harm initiative envisions a world where the most vulnerable and marginalized populations can realize the benefits of digital inclusion, without unnecessary risk.

We’re making this happen by supporting highly vulnerable civil society groups, crisis-affected populations—and the humanitarian practitioners who serve them—to reduce harm resulting from information activities and digital services deployed in natural disaster and protracted conflict environments.

We expect that our work—at the intersection of digital and human security—will become a standard part of any response environment, helping to catalyze more effective, appropriate, and accountable humanitarian action through innovative practices that are ethically-principled, locally-driven, and globally-integrated.

What we do

1. Support

operational NGOs, civil society groups, UN agencies, the private sector, and volunteer technical communities who are leveraging Information Communication Technologies and digital services in their work

2. Convene

inter-disciplinary experts, practitioners, and stakeholders around emerging topics at the intersection of digital and human security

3. advance

international policy, technical standards, and operational guidelines by generating and sharing evidence and best practices

How we do it

RISK ASSESSMENTS

Remote-based and on-site assessments of ICT-centric programs, platforms, and initiatives

GUIDANCE & TOOLS

Development of guidance and tools to respond to identified gaps in practice

WORKSHOPS & TRAININGS

Facilitation of collaborative workshops and trainings to build the capacity of practitioners on the ground

EVIDENCE & KNOWLEDGE

Disseminating knowledge and evidence on what works, what doesn’t, and why for the benefit of the sector at large

Areas of focus

Open-source investigation techniques for human rights documentation

Open-source investigation techniques for human rights documentation

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Refugee digital identification systems

tent

Mobile connectivity initiatives in formal and informal camp settlements

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Digital cash-based transfers to affected populations

skull

Employing remote sensing tools for augmenting conflict early warning capacities

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Leveraging mobile data solutions for tracking the conditions and routes of transit of affected populations on the move

aid kit

Exploiting meta data from call detail records to predict the spread of infectious diseases

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Harvesting social media for sentiment analysis and rumor tracking in fragile contexts

Beautiful iconography produced by Mangsaabguru from Noun Project

Press Inquiry

General Inquiry

Do no digital harm is administered by the friendly people at digitally responsible aid